Germany Holidays

Munich ::

Munich is the Capital of the state of Bavaria and lies near the foot of the German Alps. It is Germany's second most popular destination after Berlin, and has something to offer to everyone, be it culture, hi-tech, parks and greenery, night-life, architecture, beer gardens, shopping or the skiing and sailing close by. The most sensible way to get to Munich is really by air. Even if you are you are already on the continent, flying is still the best option.Rail is the next best option, and cross-country buses offer an often cheaper yet viable alternative. Munich, located at the river Isar in the south of Bavaria, is famous for its beautiful architecture, fine culture, and the annual Oktoberfest beer celebration. Munich's cultural scene is second to none in Germany, with the museums even considered by some to outrank Berlin in quality. Many travelers to Munich are absolutely stunned by the quality of the architecture. Although it was heavily damaged by allied bombing during World War II, many of its historic buildings have been rebuilt and the city center appears mostly as it did in the late 1800s including its largest church, the Frauenkirche, and the famous city hall (Neues Rathaus).Munich is a major international center of business, engineering, research and medicine exemplified by the presence of two research universities, a multitude of smaller colleges, headquarters of several multinational companies and worldclass technology and science museums like the Deutsches Museum and BMW Museum. It is Germany's most prosperous city and makes it repeatedly into the top 10 of global quality-of-life rankings. Munich's ability to stay at the forefront of technological developments and maintain its cultural heritage is often summarized in the chracterization as a city of "laptop and lederhosen".


Baden-Baden ::

Situated in beautiful countryside on the fringes of the Black Forest, Baden-Baden provides the most stylish setting imaginable for a cultural or health-related break. Baden-Baden's hot springs well up from a depth of 2,000 metres, supplying the town's twelve thermal spas, for example the modern Caracalla Therme and the historical Roman-Irish Friedrichsbad. The water, which reaches temperatures of up to 68°C, is used to treat a wide range of conditions, including cardiovascular problems, rheumatism, joint complaints, metabolic disorders and respiratory ailments. But even if you're fighting fit, Baden-Baden's waters will work wonders for your health and wellbeing. The same can be said of the deluxe hotels and the magnificent Lichtentaler Allee park with its 3km tree-lined avenue. The alabaster-white Kurhaus is a Baden-Baden landmark and one of the world's most beautiful casinos, while the Festspielhaus – Europe's second largest opera house and concert hall – provides a splendid venue for the festival held in honour of Herbert von Karajan every Whitsun. Lichtentaler Allee park is also home to the fascinating Frieder Burda Museum, which was designed by Richard Meier and opened in 2004. Regarded as one of the best collections of modern art in the world, the permanent exhibition includes such well-known names as Georg Baselitz, Max Beckmann, Anselm Kiefer, Ernst Ludwig Kirchner, Willem de Kooning, Markus Lüpertz, Pablo Picasso, Sigmar Polke, Jackson Pollock and Gerhard Richter. Other notable institutions are the Baden-Baden Museum, Fabergé Museum and Baden-Baden State Art Gallery as well as the theatre and philharmonic orchestra. Attracting people from all over the world, the famous horse races at the Iffezheim racecourse have been annual society events since 1858. Whatever the time of year, the beautiful old quarter is ideal for a leisurely shopping spree. Award-winning restaurants offer international specialities and refined local cuisine. Wine lovers will also appreciate the nearby wine region where, against a sweeping backdrop of vineyards, cosy inns and exquisite restaurants offer a culinary voyage of great distinction. And it must be clear by now that Baden-Baden is a destination of great distinction.

Berlin ::

When people think of Berlin, the first thing that usually comes to mind is its most famous landmark – the Brandenburg Gate. For decades a symbol of division, the monument has always been the beating heart of a major city bursting with ideas, inspiration, art, culture and creativity. Highlights in the western parts of Berlin include the Kurfürstendamm, as elegant a shopping street as you'll find anywhere, the Kaufhaus des Westens department store (better known as KaDeWe), on-trend boutiques and exclusive galleries, as well as beautiful residential streets and, of course, Berlin's famous nightlife. And speaking of nightlife, no trip to Berlin would be complete without an evening at Friedrichstadt Palast, Germany's leading variety theatre. With the current production, SHOW ME, the Palast is said to have mounted the most expensive and dazzling stage show of all time. This Berlin spectacle is the very height of glamour – an explosion of light, colours, costumes and special effects. The cosmopolitan vibe also permeates the government district, which spreads out to the east from Brandenburg Gate and from the neighbouringReichstag. There's a sense of peace and freedom in the air here – in stark contrast to the days when Berlin was responsible for unthinkable crimes. The memorial to the murdered Jews of Europe, a work by New York architect Peter Eisenman located near the Brandenburg Gate, serves as a reminder of those atrocities, as does the Topography of Terror documentation centre at the former Gestapo headquarters. Berlin's prestigious Unter den Linden boulevard extends eastwards from Brandenburg Gate towardsAlexanderplatz square, passing the Museum Island World Heritage site, as well as Berlin Cathedral, the Neue Wache and the baroque Zeughaus (armoury), which today houses the German Historical Museum. Keep going far enough and you'll reach the TV tower, which to this day remains the tallest structure in Germany. The view from the top, stretching across Berlin and all the way toBrandenburg, is a major sightseeing highlight. Nearby isGendarmenmarkt, widely lauded as Berlin's most beautiful square. The German Cathedral, the French Cathedral and the Concert Hall form an ensemble of great majesty and grandeur here. The atmosphere of the Hackesche Höfe, also within the central Mitte district, is somewhat less grand, but all the more laid-back, easygoing and relaxed for it. This retail complex is the largest series of enclosed courtyards in Germany and has been heritage-listed since 1977. For an authentic taste of Old Berlin, explore the courtyards' vibrant mix of art galleries, cinemas, theatres, variety venues, restaurants and bars, not to mention all the welcoming little shops and big-name flagship stores. There's also no escaping the city's artistic flair here. A characteristic that, nearly a quarter of a century after the fall of the Berlin Wall, remains a defining feature, perhaps more so than in any other capital. Berlin is the creative workshop of Germany, a trendsetter and a capital of fashion, design and music. The progressive spirit of optimism that engulfed the reunified city was – and still is – astounding. Hundreds of backyard art studios emerged from the shadows and art soon began to take over streets, the walls of buildings and even entire districts. Famously, artists have also appropriated the remains of the Berlin Wall: the section from Oberbaum bridge to Ostbahnhof station, now going by the name of East Side Gallery, has become an illustrated encyclopaedia of street art. Today, Kreuzberg, Prenzlauer Berg, Neukölln and Wedding are the districts of choice for more than 20,000 artists. It is this creative force that lies behind the city's distinctive vibe – a vibe that renders Berlin the capital for alternative and established art alike. Immerse yourself in this creative cosmos. Let yourself be inspired, seduced and enchanted. Get to know the people of Berlin. Besides all the sightseeing, the locals are arguably the best reason to discover this incredible city – and the perfect excuse to come back and visit.

Colonge ::

Cologne’s Old Town has a distinctive historical charm. Visitors are drawn by its rustic narrow alleyways lined with traditional old houses. Innumerable breweries, pubs and restaurants invite passersby to linger. Here you can enjoy a draft Kölsch beer or try Cologne’s typical Halver Hahn sandwich.Located directly along the Rhine, the Old Town, together with Cologne Cathedral, the Romanesque church Great St. Martin and the tower of the historic City Hall, makes up the world-famous Rhine panorama. As you stroll through the narrow alleys, you will come across many museums, such as the Romano-Germanic Museum, the Wallraf Richartz Museum, the Museum Ludwig and the Farina Fragrance Museum. You can also discover many monuments and fountains in Cologne’s Old Town, including the figures of Tünnes and Schäl and the Heinzelmännchen (Cologne elves) fountain. Historical remains, such as the Archeological Zone, the Old St. Alban Memorial, and the Stapelhaus invite you to go on an exciting journey of discovery into the city’s past. As the centre of Cologne’s old neighbourhood of handicrafts and trade, Alter Markt and Heumarkt are major attractions for Cologne residents and visitors. Surrounded by many small restaurants and cafés, this area is an inviting place in which to relax in the sun during every season of the year.

Weimar ::

Weimar, famed as the city of Goethe and the great center of German classical literature, lies in the valley of the Ilm in the southeast of the Thuringian Basin, to the south of the Grosser Ettersberg.Luther, Cranach and Bach all lived and worked in the town, but Weimar's great days began in the 18th C., when it was the home of Wieland, Goethe, Herder and Schiller. In the 19th C., great musicians were attracted to the town, and the Art School founded in 1860 brought famous painters to Weimar.Between 1902 and 1914 the Art School, now the College of Arts and Crafts, was directed by Henry van de Velde. From this college stemmed the Bauhaus, founded by Gropius in 1919, which in 1925 moved to Dessau).After the First World War the German National Assembly met in the National Theatre in Weimar and in 1919 adopted the constitution of the "Weimar Republic." In 1920 Weimar became capital of the Land of Thuringia, formed by the amalgamation of many small territorial domains.During the Nazi period the notorious Buchenwald concentration camp was established in the immediate vicinity of the town.In 1998, UNESCO designated "Classical Weimar" a World Heritage Site.The town of Weimar was named a European Capital of Culture in 1999.A fire in 2004 destroyed 40,000 to 50,000 items in the collection at the Duchess Anna Amalia Library in Weimar. The library building and a great deal of the collection was restored and the library reopened in 2007

Munich ::

Munich is the Capital of the state of Bavaria and lies near the foot of the German Alps. It is Germany's second most popular destination after Berlin, and has something to offer to everyone, be it culture, hi-tech, parks and greenery, night-life, architecture, beer gardens, shopping or the skiing and sailing close by. The most sensible way to get to Munich is really by air. Even if you are you are already on the continent, flying is still the best option.Rail is the next best option, and cross-country buses offer an often cheaper yet viable alternative. Munich, located at the river Isar in the south of Bavaria, is famous for its beautiful architecture, fine culture, and the annual Oktoberfest beer celebration. Munich's cultural scene is second to none in Germany, with the museums even considered by some to outrank Berlin in quality. Many travelers to Munich are absolutely stunned by the quality of the architecture. Although it was heavily damaged by allied bombing during World War II, many of its historic buildings have been rebuilt and the city center appears mostly as it did in the late 1800s including its largest church, the Frauenkirche, and the famous city hall (Neues Rathaus).Munich is a major international center of business, engineering, research and medicine exemplified by the presence of two research universities, a multitude of smaller colleges, headquarters of several multinational companies and worldclass technology and science museums like the Deutsches Museum and BMW Museum. It is Germany's most prosperous city and makes it repeatedly into the top 10 of global quality-of-life rankings. Munich's ability to stay at the forefront of technological developments and maintain its cultural heritage is often summarized in the chracterization as a city of "laptop and lederhosen".


Dresden ::

Dresden became a city in 1206 and recently celebrated its 800th birthday in 2006.It was home to many Saxon princes and kings, the most famous of them being August der Starke , whose kingdom included Poland as well. They appertained to the family of the Wettiner and were closely related to many other European royal families. Many buildings date from their reign and especially the rich art collections are testimony of their extreme wealth. The "Madonna Sixtina" was for instance bought by the son of August the Strong.The last Saxon king abdicated in 1918.The historical centre of Dresden was 75% destroyed by Allied bombing in 1945. These events are deeply marked in the history of the city and are still remembered each year in processions and ceremonies. More than 30,000 people died in the bombing - the exact number is unknown. For many years the ruins and now the newly rebuilt Frauenkirche, with its donated gold cupola from the UK, acted as a call for peace among the different nations of the world.The historical centre is nowadays largely restored to its former glory, however some parts are still under reconstruction.Dresden has about ten million tourists a year, most of them from Germany. The Zwinger was rebuilt in 1964, the Semper Opera house in 1985, and the now most famous landmark of Dresden, the Frauenkirche, in 2005. When asked what they like most about their city, Dresden citizens will reply Old Town (which is quite compact, even though it has a lot of well-known attractions and museums of worldwide meaning), Dresden-Neustadt (an alternative central quarter) and the surroundings like the wine townRadebeul, the climbing area Saxon Switzerland, lots of castles, and most of the city landscape of about 80 quarters.The level of international tourism is growing, especially from the US and China since Dresden is a stop between Prague andBerlin. Architecturally, Blasewitz is the most interesting living quarter, despite it being a hilly landscape. Some people think, that the sand stone buildings look black because of burnings or polution. This is not true. Sandstone turns naturally dark after a while. You can see the dark stones as well in the near by saxon switzerland and on pictures of Dresden from the 18th Century, where the sandstone-buildings are black as well.Dresden lies in the former German Democratic Republic and the GDR-Architecture is still well visible in the city. In the city center The "Prager Straße" and the "Kulturpalast" are examples for classical GDR architecture. If you leave the center you will find a lot of appartment blocks, called "Plattenbau" as they are typical in eastern europe and russia. Traces of World War II are not visible in the city anymore.